Ken “The Virus Doctor” Dwight on Malware Threats at SpiceWorld 2017

The Virus DoctorKen “The Virus Doctor” Dwight and I sat down at SpiceWorld 2017 to discuss ransomware and other malware threats to you and your security. Ken Dwight has been in the cybersecurity business for as long as cybersecurity has been a thing and long before anyone coined the term, cybersecurity.

Ken also offers his book and a Virus Remediation class from his website. He has helped many companies recover from virus infestations, ransomware attacks, and various malware infections. He is a consultant, a speaker, and a practitioner in the dark art of virus killing.

It was a pleasure to speak with Mr. Dwight on camera at SpiceWorld 2017.

Copyright 2017 The SecurityNOW Show. License: CC BY.

SSH Communications Founder Tatu Ylönen Speaks on IoT Security (Podcast)

SSH CommunicationsPreston and I had the rare honor of speaking with SSH Communications founder, Tatu Ylönen about IoT device security. For those of you who don’t know, Tatu Ylönen is the inventor and original programmer of the SSH protocol. There’s absolutely no one in the world more qualified to speak on security than Tatu.

Tatu YlönenHe single-handedly protected us all from plain text transmissions and essentially destroyed the old Telnet protocol for good. In this podcast, we discuss the importance of IoT security. IoT security has traditionally been ignored because the few devices that existed weren’t particularly vulnerable to hacking either because no one cared or no one had access to the hardware and software to do so. That’s no longer true. Everyone has access to exploitation tools and the time for focusing on a more secure IoT has arrived.

For IoT manufacturers, you should listen carefully to Tatu’s advice and insights. Some of these devices and networks carry high-value data, including possibly personal data and that needs to be protected.

Podcast details:

Length: 14:43 minutes. Format: MP3. Rating: G for all audiences.

A special thanks to Tatu Ylönen and to the Nadel Phelan agency for connecting us.

IoT and Mobile Security with Zimperium CPO John Michelsen (Podcast)

ZimperiumIn this podcast, Preston, our guest John Michelsen, CPO of Zimperium, and I discuss mobile security and extrapolate what’s happening in that space to what’s happening, and about to happen, with IoT security. We touch on monitoring, general security, costs, and the bigger problem of security implementation on devices that until recently were used based on an “air of trust.”

April is our “Month of Preventing Surprises” and this podcast kicks off that topic for The SecurityNOW Show. How awkward would it be to move headlong into a large IoT implementation only to realize that someone has easily hacked your devices and siphoned off your data? Surprise!

Mobile security has come a long way in the past two years with the adoption of higher security measures from vendors and third parties, such as per-app VPN, two-factor authentication, and containerization. IoT vendors will have to step up and enable encryption, use multi-factor authentication, and wipe or brick devices that have been compromised or moved. The Internet of Things may very well be security’s biggest challenge yet, not only because of the sheer numbers of devices but also because of device diversity.

Preston, John, and I just touch the surface of these topics in this podcast but stay tuned for more from all three of us on IoT security.

Podcast details:

Length: 20:45 minutes. Format: MP3. Rating: G for all audiences.

Licensed CC BY (2017)

SecurityNOW’s Cybersecurity Tips of the Week – March 31, 2017

TipsPasswords, they used to say, are like toothbrushes–don’t share them and change them often. Indeed that rule is still true but security is more than just changing your passwords often and keeping them to yourself. Passwords, unfortunately, are our first line of defense in protecting our online accounts, our identities, and our transactions. Passwords should be as long and as complex as possible, which is why you should use a password manager such as LastPass. LastPass will generate a random, long, and complex password that you don’t have to remember because it remembers them for you. There’s only two things you have to remember when you use LastPass: logoff of LastPass before you leave your computer and the LastPass master password.

And since passwords aren’t your only defense in this cyber-connected and unsafe world, I’m providing a list of tips to help keep you safe and secure during your online excursions. Read and heed.

  1. Use the screen lock feature of your phones, tablets, and computers.
  2. Use a random non-guessable passcode for unlocking screens.
  3. Use a password manager.
  4. Use different passwords for each online account (saved in your password manager)
  5. Install all hardware and software updates as they’re presented.
  6. Only install apps from the app store and only those that have many good reviews.
  7. Turn off tracking from your apps.
  8. Use a VPN or your cellular network in public places.
  9. Keep phone conversations private.
  10. Perform online banking in private.
  11. Use two-factor authentication on social media and financial sites.
  12. Cover your device when entering passwords.

I know these are tips that you read and hear all the time but you need to remember them at all times. There is no trusted public environment and a secured WiFi connection is no guarantee of security. Anyone can setup a WiFi connection and supply a common password to it.

If you ever have questions about cybersecurity, use our contact page to ask your questions. We will reply.

Druva’s Dave Packer on Cloud Backup and Security (Podcast)

DruvaDave Packer, Head of Corporate and Product Marketing at Druva and I spoke about Druva’s In-Sync and Phoenix products, security, backup, restore, and disaster recovery. We also discussed how your data is encrypted in flight during backup, how it’s stored encrypted, and how you get restored via an encrypted link. I also told him how much I love Druva In-Sync because it never bogs down my workstation for backup–in fact, I never know it’s running.

Podcast details:

Format: Mp3. Length: 29:58mins. Rating: G.